Ballaun Stone at Ballybuggy said to have the imprint of Brigids head. A cure for headaches!!!
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St. Brigid in Co. Laois

St. Brigid of Kildare is regarded as Ireland’s second Saint, who is associated with fertility, healing and water. She was said to have performed many miracles including turning water into beer! Her patronage extends to dairy workers, blacksmiths, midwives and travellers. Brigid is said to have been born into a noble family at Faughart, Dundalk in 451 A.D, approximately 20 years after the arrival of St. Patrick to Ireland. Her story in Ireland is legendary

Former location of St. Molua's trough or reliquary from the 19th Century
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God or Gods at Old Kyle Borris-In-Ossory

    Old Kyle once formed part of an important Early Christian Monastic site on the borders of the ancient Kingdoms of Munster and Leinster. It also seems likely that the site was of significance, long before the arrival of Christianity to Ireland in the 5th Century A.D. Old Kyle is recorded in early records as Clonfertmulloe, association with St. Molua, one of the foremost monks of Ireland from the 6th Century. Set within the

1837 Map Of Laois
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“A Tale of Two Counties”- Durrow Co. Laois

The name Durrow suggests an ancient wood or forest of Oak (Darú) which once encompassed this area in Co. Laois. A settlement sprung up here in the Early Medieval Period (400-1169 A.D) associated with an early church site attributed to St. Fintan Maeldubh (7th Century). This monastery is believed to have stood on the grounds of the present Protestant Church in the town until its ruins were knocked in 1731 (Carrigan 1905, vol. 2). There

Dysartgallen Church and Graveyard
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Dysartgallen Church and the Ford of the Cross

Dysartgallan Church (LA030-011001-) is set in the picturesque landscape of the Owenbeg River valley in south County Laois, approximately 3km northeast of Ballinakill village. The site is located within the townland of Aghnacross, civil parish of Dysartgallan or Ballinakill. The Church is located within 50 meters of the Owenbeg River and it would appear that a fording point existed where the current road bridge transverses this tributary of the Nore, hence the Irish name for

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A Late Medieval Baptismal Font at Coolbanagher, Co. Laois

This exquisite Late Medieval baptismal font is housed in St. John’s Church of Ireland at Coolbanagher Co. Laois. The font predates the church by approximately 400 or more years. According to Roe (1947) the font had formed part of Lord Portarlington’s garden ornamentation at Emo Court before it was acquired by the rector of this church (Rev. Dudley Fletcher) in the 1930’s. Prior to this the general consensus is that the font belonged to the

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Galesquarter Sheela-na-Gig

This Sheela-na-Gig is located on the south end of the east wall of the great Mac Gilla Padraig Castle at Cullahill Co. Laois. There are at least seven recorded Sheela’s from the county of which only three can be traced today. Sheela-na-Gigs are often found on old monastic buildings throughout the country as well as at some castle sites. In general the Sheela’s are carved in relief holding their genitalia, this theme is evident from